the-actual-universe

asylum-art:

Miloslav Druckmüller: Moon mathematicians under the lens 

2014-08-02- Ping photography world

Shooting eclipse perhaps the most challenging astronomical photography. First, the light and shade of the transients, the photographer needs to quickly adjust the camera parameters are accurate; Secondly, if the shooting fails, you may need to wait several years. Czech mathematician Miloslav Druckmüller is a total solar eclipse fanatic who chase shot. Through his time and accurate calculation of the eclipse track, from 1980 to date to India, Chile, Angola, France, Zambia, Australia, Uganda, Kenya and many other places to shoot a total solar eclipse. Miloslav think it presents a challenging eclipse photos, each map requires a different degree of multiple exposure image synthesis. Distinguish between the use of highly sophisticated software, through the adaptation of human vision can be filtered in order to obtain such a different moon scene.-Sorry  for the translation!

 (Editor: Li Ping)

Sorry  for the translation!

Via: photoworld

laboratoryequipment

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematics and Traditional Cuisine

The mathematics of Pasta: A process analysis to find unity, formulas and ways to express structure mathematics of pasta shapes, by their mathematical and geometric properties.
See more at: The Maths of Pasta by George L. Legendre.

Image: 

  • 'Pasta By Design' - Created by a team of designers, ‘Pasta by Design’ book reveals the hidden mathematical beauty of pasta: its geometrical shapes and surfaces are explained by mathematical formulae, drawings and illustrations.
  • Animated gifs - From video: The traditional pasta making techniques used at Della Terra Pasta by Chris Becker [Video] - shared at here.

Types of Pasta in the post (From left to right):  Agnolotti - Tortellini - Saccottini - Sagne Incannulate - Pappardelle.

spaceexp
spaceexp:

sagansense:
On this Earth day of August 6, 2014, a wonderful feat will be achieved, recorded into our timeline of human history, and will set a precedent for subsequent robotic emissaries moving forward.
Amidst the strife and persecution, the tyranny, war, genocide; the economic woes throttling the health and welfare of our civilization bred from artificial barriers we’ve constructed - mental and physical - that mortgage our longevity as a species…amidst the turmoil constantly blinding us from our preciousness in space and time which we owe to the biological sophistication of our single-celled ancestors,
…we’ve come together, both NASA and ESA - a consortium of 20 member states - to now witness another demonstration of international collaboration. The dream, inception, construction, and launch - in 2004 - of a spacecraft (and accompanying lander) now beginning its rendezvous with a planetary body, a comet, dubbed 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, named after discoverers Klim Ivanovych Churyumov and Svetlana Ivanova Gerasimenko, who first observed it on photographic plates in 1969.
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken by Rosetta’s NavCam and OSIRIS science camera during the spacecraft’s approach to the comet in July and August, 2014. The last image, at lower right, was taken on August 4. [source]
The spacecraft is just as intriguing as the comet, however. Rosetta is a joint operation: a probe and a lander.
The probe, Rosetta, is named after the Egyptian basalt slab - the Rosetta Stone - which were inscribed three distinct scripts of various origin: Egyptianhieroglyphs, Demotic, and Ancient Greek.
Learn more about the Rosetta Stone here.
The lander’s name - Philae - was provided its name due to the Nile Island ‘Philae’, to which one of two obelisks were discovered which were inscribed with Ancient Greek and Egyptian inscriptions as well.
The Philae obelisk with Kingston Lacy in the background. [source]
In combination with one another - the obelisk and the Rosetta Stone - these two discoveries led to a great understanding of the Egyptian writing system, enabling further knowledge of our ancient history.
Just as the Philae obelisk and the Rosetta Stone granted us further understanding of our development as a species regarding our cultural history, Rosetta (the spacecraft) and Philae (the lander) will provide us further insight into the formation and content of comets, and thus, the origins of our early solar system.
An artist’s visualization of Rosetta/Philae and comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko [source]
Today, Rosetta (courtesy of NASA/ESA) will be the first spacecraft to ever rendezvous with a comet, escort (orbit) it along the comet’s trajectory toward the Sun, and deploy Philae (courtesy of DLR, MPS, CNES and ASI) to its surface.

The details are robust, but Rosetta’s orbital insertion (entry into orbit) will begin with a succession of triangular arcs (about 100km long), taking about 3-4 days to complete each one, with short thruster burns at each apex in order to redirect it toward/into each arc path to stay near the comet. The reason for this is due to the comet’s current speed and trajectory as it heads on its current path toward the Sun. Upon each triangular arc, Rosetta will be lowered closer to the comet’s surface until 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko captures the spacecraft with its gravity. Read more on today’s events HERE.
ESA’s video “How To Orbit A Comet” provides a beautifully animated visual guide regarding the Rosetta mission timeline and series of events.
Philae’s mission is quite different. Rosetta will come within about 10km of the comet’s nucleus to deploy the lander in November 2014. It will take several hours to reach comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko’s surface due to the extremely low gravity. Landing gear will absorb the small amount of force when reaching the surface, and ice screws in the probe’s legs - accompanied with a harpoon system - will lock onto the comet’s surface for sustained stability. Simultaneously, a thruster on the top of the lander will force it down to counteract the impulse of the harpoon, which will result in a force exerted from the opposing direction. Once anchored to the comet, Philae will commence its main objectives, which comprise 10 science instruments, and can be read about in detail HERE.

Again, ESA provides a beautiful animation regarding this part of the mission (watch it here), showcasing 5 of the 10 instruments in action: CIVA, ROLIS, SD2, MUPUS and APXS.
Artist’s visualization of Philae’s rendezvous/landing on the comet’s surface. [source]
This magnificent series of robotic maneuvers happens today, and you can follow along beginning at 8:00 GMT [10:00 CEST] via the link below :)
Rosetta mission timeline/overview [source]
Keep up with Rosetta via @ESA, andjoin the livestream event at 8:00 GMT [10:00 CEST]!
Stay curious.

spaceexp:

sagansense:

On this Earth day of August 6, 2014, a wonderful feat will be achieved, recorded into our timeline of human history, and will set a precedent for subsequent robotic emissaries moving forward.

Amidst the strife and persecution, the tyranny, war, genocide; the economic woes throttling the health and welfare of our civilization bred from artificial barriers we’ve constructed - mental and physical - that mortgage our longevity as a species…amidst the turmoil constantly blinding us from our preciousness in space and time which we owe to the biological sophistication of our single-celled ancestors,

…we’ve come together, both NASA and ESA - a consortium of 20 member states - to now witness another demonstration of international collaboration. The dream, inception, construction, and launch - in 2004 - of a spacecraft (and accompanying lander) now beginning its rendezvous with a planetary body, a comet, dubbed 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, named after discoverers Klim Ivanovych Churyumov and Svetlana Ivanova Gerasimenko, who first observed it on photographic plates in 1969.

imageComet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken by Rosetta’s NavCam and OSIRIS science camera during the spacecraft’s approach to the comet in July and August, 2014. The last image, at lower right, was taken on August 4. [source]

The spacecraft is just as intriguing as the comet, however. Rosetta is a joint operation: a probe and a lander.

The probe, Rosetta, is named after the Egyptian basalt slab - the Rosetta Stone - which were inscribed three distinct scripts of various origin: Egyptianhieroglyphs, Demotic, and Ancient Greek.

imageLearn more about the Rosetta Stone here.

The lander’s name - Philae - was provided its name due to the Nile Island ‘Philae’, to which one of two obelisks were discovered which were inscribed with Ancient Greek and Egyptian inscriptions as well.

imageThe Philae obelisk with Kingston Lacy in the background. [source]

In combination with one another - the obelisk and the Rosetta Stone - these two discoveries led to a great understanding of the Egyptian writing system, enabling further knowledge of our ancient history.

Just as the Philae obelisk and the Rosetta Stone granted us further understanding of our development as a species regarding our cultural history, Rosetta (the spacecraft) and Philae (the lander) will provide us further insight into the formation and content of comets, and thus, the origins of our early solar system.

imageAn artist’s visualization of Rosetta/Philae and comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko [source]

Today, Rosetta (courtesy of NASA/ESA) will be the first spacecraft to ever rendezvous with a comet, escort (orbit) it along the comet’s trajectory toward the Sun, and deploy Philae (courtesy of DLR, MPS, CNES and ASI) to its surface.

image

The details are robust, but Rosetta’s orbital insertion (entry into orbit) will begin with a succession of triangular arcs (about 100km long), taking about 3-4 days to complete each one, with short thruster burns at each apex in order to redirect it toward/into each arc path to stay near the comet. The reason for this is due to the comet’s current speed and trajectory as it heads on its current path toward the Sun. Upon each triangular arc, Rosetta will be lowered closer to the comet’s surface until 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko captures the spacecraft with its gravity. Read more on today’s events HERE.

imageESA’s video “How To Orbit A Comet” provides a beautifully animated visual guide regarding the Rosetta mission timeline and series of events.

Philae’s mission is quite different. Rosetta will come within about 10km of the comet’s nucleus to deploy the lander in November 2014. It will take several hours to reach comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko’s surface due to the extremely low gravity. Landing gear will absorb the small amount of force when reaching the surface, and ice screws in the probe’s legs - accompanied with a harpoon system - will lock onto the comet’s surface for sustained stability. Simultaneously, a thruster on the top of the lander will force it down to counteract the impulse of the harpoon, which will result in a force exerted from the opposing direction. Once anchored to the comet, Philae will commence its main objectives, which comprise 10 science instruments, and can be read about in detail HERE.

image

Again, ESA provides a beautiful animation regarding this part of the mission (watch it here), showcasing 5 of the 10 instruments in action: CIVA, ROLIS, SD2, MUPUS and APXS.

imageArtist’s visualization of Philae’s rendezvous/landing on the comet’s surface. [source]

This magnificent series of robotic maneuvers happens today, and you can follow along beginning at 8:00 GMT [10:00 CEST] via the link below :)

imageRosetta mission timeline/overview [source]

Keep up with Rosetta via @ESA, andjoin the livestream event at 8:00 GMT [10:00 CEST]!

imageimageStay curious.

scienceyoucanlove

scienceyoucanlove:

Today I would like to put a spotlight on the amazing wildlife photographer Marina Cano! 

Below is a statement from her website

'I’m a  wildlife photographer, based in Cantabria, in the North of Spain. I’ve been taking pictures since I was a teenager. My work has been published around the world and have won international awards.

In 2009 I’ve published my book, Cabárceno, with the pictures I’ve took for three years in the largest park of wildlife in Europe, with the same name.

In December 2012 I published my second book: Drama & Intimacy, a carefully selection from the pictures I took in South Africa, Kenya, England and Cabarceno. I’ve also made exhibitions in Cape Town, London, Spain… Currently I’m shooting wildlife in Africa, and I’m amazed with the beauty I’ve found everywhere.’

you can follow her on facebook or twitter 

and see more of her gorgeous photography here